Sunday, September 16, 2007

KFC 1971

This is a VERrrrrrrrrrrry simple ad with no major USP being touted about and screaming into the faces of the viewers...

Talks volumes about how much the ads have morphed over the years where the focus is more on entertaining the viewer.
Err..That's what I watch ads for .. I dunno about the rest of the junta... No amount of "Cos you are worth it" lines are gonna make me hide my grays.

Well, "Thinking Outside the Bun" I consider myself impervious to the jingle-chants... ;)

Levi's Blind Man Ad

Mistaken Identity:
A man in Men's room, with a cane; A good looking fugitive loaded with cash....

See what happens next!!!!

Friday, September 7, 2007

Lego - Relativity

During my visit to Mall of America (MOA) America's Largest Mall at Minneapolis, I dropped by the Lego Imagination Centre. The Lego constructions were mind blowing. And very similar to the Miniland of Lego.

For more reference check this up:

The picture above is something that I chanced upon while surfing and felt it derserved amention for the effort that has gone into creating the Lego rendition of MC Escher's Relativity Painting.

 would provide more information on LEGOLAND

Trivia:Courtesy Wikipedia
  • The word "Lego" comes from Danish leg godt which translates to "play well". The name could also be interpreted as "I put together" or "I assemble" in Latin, though this would be a somewhat forced application of the general sense "I collect; I gather; I learn"; the word is most used in the derived sense, "I read". The cognate Greek verb "λέγω" also means "gather, pick up", but this can include constructing a stone wall.
  • Lego Group produces over 306 million miniature tires each year - more than any other tire manufacturer in the world.
  • Six 2x4 Lego bricks of the same color can be put together in 915,103,765 ways, and just three bricks of the same color offer 1,560 combinations. The figure of 102,981,500 is often given for six pieces, but it is incorrect. The number 102,981,504 (four more than that figure) is the number of six-piece towers (of a height of six)
  • Motto: det bedste er ikke for godt. Danish for "The best isn't good enough". This motto was created by Ole Kirk to encourage his employees never to skimp on quality, a value he believed in strongly.
  • On average, everyone in the world has 62 Lego bricks each.
  • Only one percent of the plastic waste in Lego factories goes unrecycled

Lucky Strike Retro Pick 2

Lucky Strike GreenIn 1942, smokers of Lucky Strike Cigarettes noticed a drastic change to the Lucky Strike packs. Instead of the usual dark green and gold, the packs were white with red trim. On the bottom of the new packs was a curious abbreviation, "L.S./M.F.T." The reason for the change was heard on the radio commercials for Lucky Strike.

Like with many other products during World War II, the Lucky Strike radio commercials had a patriotic theme. The radio listeners heard the announcer say, "Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War." What he meant, the green dye used for the packaging of the Lucky Strike packs would be used for the war effort. The phrase was heard frequently on all programs Lucky Strike sponsored at that time. Unfortunately, it also stirred up a hornet’s nest with one program.

When Lucky Strike sponsored INFORMATION PLEASE (1940-1943), it was a marriage that was made in a lower place than Heaven. From the very beginning, it was a battle between 2 strong willed men, George Washington Hill, the big cheese of the American Tobacco Company, and Dan Golenpaul, the creator of INFORMATION PLEASE. While this relationship was stormy, it took the infamous Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War phrase to really stir up trouble.

Lucky Strike Presents Information PleaseDuring a typical broadcast of INFORMATION PLEASE, the phrase was uttered or whispered at every opportunity it could be said--- even during the program! When there was a brief pause in the conversation between M.C. Clifton Fadiman and the program’s panelists, the phrase was presented. Not only did this prove to be a distraction with the radio listeners, it also made Golenpaul furious. With the concern of ruining the program, Golenpaul asked Hill to drop the constant presentation of the phrase. Hill refused. The bitter sponsor/program relationship would eventually go to court. It was a well-publicized event. Public opinion had Golenpaul as the good guy and Hill as the villain. The case was dismissed, but the stormy program/sponsor relationship came to a merciful end. Golenpaul was finally rid of Hill, Lucky Strike, and the annoying phrase.

Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War not only rubbed Golenpaul the wrong way, it also grated the nerves of the people who mattered the most--- the radio listeners. In a 1943 poll conducted in Woman’s Day magazine, Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War was voted one of the most disliked radio commercials by the listeners who participated.

Lucky Strike LS/MFT After Hill thought it served its purpose, Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War passed into radio advertising oblivion--- much to the relief of the listeners. With L.S./M.F.T. becoming the catch phrase, the Lucky Strike commercials continued the tradition as a source of unpopularity with the listeners. (For the record, L.S./M.F.T. was also voted unpopular in the Woman’s Day poll).

On paper, Lucky Strike Green Has Gone To War appeared to be a patriotic gesture to help the Allies. The truth to the matter was that Hill intended to change and modernize the Lucky Strike packs anyway. It just so happened World War II was in progress--- and the "sacrifice" of the green dye made the American Tobacco Company look good with the public.

Courtesy -- Old Time Commercials

Phil Collins - Cadbury

Full Credits
Client: Cadbury Dairy Milk
Agency: Fallon, London
Creative: Juan Cabral
Director: Juan Cabral
Agency Producer: Nicky Barnes
Production Company: Blink

But then you wonder WHY A GORILLA for a Chocolate Ad?? What is the correlation?

But nonetheless the Nod to Phil Collins ad was well deseverd even if the link is fuzzy.

Nike - Rush Hour - Gone Running,nikewomen#l=nikestore,nikewomen,rushhour&re=US&co=US&la=EN

Reinforcing women's athletic aptitude and multitasking skills
As part of its latest apparel launch, Nike has created a series of web films and an interactive campaign--including widgets, screensavers and banners--that highlight girl power while imploring the virtues of physical fitness.

Applying an on-the-go mentality, the women featured in the late summer Nike print/digital campaign cede their hectic 9-5 life for a spell of pounding the pavement, strapping on running clothes and kicks during situations like taking a cab or heading down the elevator.

The website for Nike's female footwear campaign features the handful of web films and a 'Gone Running' sign with real-time clock attached, with the block letters in the copy boasting that "someone who is busier than you is running right now."